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spaces.faces.things.time

I adore designer Mara Hoffman’s use of color, textiles, and prints. Photography by Therese Aldgard

Photography by Fergus Padel

I’m totally in awe of this image. One of my contacts posted this image the other day…and for some reason it was as though I saw a very small glimpse of myself way into the future. I unfortunately don’t know who this woman is nor do I know who the photographer is to give credit…

I’m totally in awe of this image. One of my contacts posted this image the other day…and for some reason it was as though I saw a very small glimpse of myself way into the future. I unfortunately don’t know who this woman is nor do I know who the photographer is to give credit…

portraitsofboston:

“Why did you choose me? Of all the people around, why did you think I was interesting?”“I find that everyone is interesting if I talk to them long enough.”“But why me?”“I think it was your face.”“Not my clothes?”“I thought your clothes complemented your face and made me think you might have something insightful to say.”“The clothes mean nothing.”“You’re right. I would’ve approached you even if you were wearing a suit.”“I don’t wear suits. Whenever I visit a country such as Senegal, I wear its clothing. I also wear it here because everyone else is dressed in tight clothes.”“Then your clothes do mean something.”“But not what you think. What you’re looking for is so ethereal, so superficial, that it’s meaningless.”“I think about this all the time. Ideally, I’m looking for something deep.”“You’re looking for it in the wrong place.”“But I think we’re getting there. You seem to have a lot of wisdom.”“No, I don’t. I’m telling, you’re not going to find it in the city. The wisdom is in the simplicity. I’m not denying that there are a lot of good things here. But every building you see was built by laborers, brick by brick. Everything I do, I do it to honor the campesinos. Sometimes they call them peasants, and the word implies something bad. We think of them as poor and uneducated, but they’re rich. We think we’re on top, but the simple man is on top. The farmer, the person who works with his hands. He is on top.”
*In New Orleans

indeed…

portraitsofboston:

“Why did you choose me? Of all the people around, why did you think I was interesting?”
“I find that everyone is interesting if I talk to them long enough.”
“But why me?”
“I think it was your face.”
“Not my clothes?”
“I thought your clothes complemented your face and made me think you might have something insightful to say.”
“The clothes mean nothing.”
“You’re right. I would’ve approached you even if you were wearing a suit.”
“I don’t wear suits. Whenever I visit a country such as Senegal, I wear its clothing. I also wear it here because everyone else is dressed in tight clothes.”
“Then your clothes do mean something.”
“But not what you think. What you’re looking for is so ethereal, so superficial, that it’s meaningless.”
“I think about this all the time. Ideally, I’m looking for something deep.”
“You’re looking for it in the wrong place.”
“But I think we’re getting there. You seem to have a lot of wisdom.”
“No, I don’t. I’m telling, you’re not going to find it in the city. The wisdom is in the simplicity. I’m not denying that there are a lot of good things here. But every building you see was built by laborers, brick by brick. Everything I do, I do it to honor the campesinos. Sometimes they call them peasants, and the word implies something bad. We think of them as poor and uneducated, but they’re rich. We think we’re on top, but the simple man is on top. The farmer, the person who works with his hands. He is on top.”

*In New Orleans

indeed…

Beautiful series of images by photographer Eric Valli.

ferrarisheppard:

Maria and Legend (photo: Judy Dater)

ferrarisheppard:

Maria and Legend (photo: Judy Dater)

  on Flickr.

on Flickr.

Arbor by Jacob Van Loon

Arbor by Jacob Van Loon

via.. mpdrolet: From Hanoolaato by Alex Potter

via.. mpdrolet: From Hanoolaato by Alex Potter

love

mengly - from “the gift” by Delphine Diaw Diallo

mengly - from “the gift” by Delphine Diaw Diallo

Nº. 1 of  11